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Posts published by “Michael Koepf”

As the Gentle Rain from Heaven

“The quality of mercy is not strained. It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest: It blesseth…

What Do I Know?

I know this: When it comes to Judi Bari and the oft-repeated assertion that Michael Sweeney wrote the Lord’s Avenger Letter, all I can say…

Bre’r Rabbit & The Political-Media Complex

Forget about the famed military-industrial complex of the Eisenhower years. It isn’t what it was. Yes, we have a military, but the industrial complex was…

Homeboy Dave

On a scale of one to ten, I admit that when it comes to governance, my confidence in the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors is…

Tax Party!

A black, stretch limo speeds west on Low Gap Road, careens into the Mendocino County government complex, and comes to an abrupt stop. Several laughing figures rush from the building with bottles of Dom Perignon. They pile into the limo. The door remains open with the engine idling.

Stickup

By way of analogy allow me to exaggerate about how to rob a bank without a gun. First, you become an elected official—say, a Mendocino…

Chairman John

I’m beginning to know John. Not completely, of course, for who can entirely know another when we seldom wholly know ourselves? Nevertheless, when it comes…

Know Your Snitch

The letter arrived in the mail. They turned me down. Mendocino County refused to issue me a business license for short-term rentals. The Mendocino County…

At The End Of The River

Cattails. I saw them for the first time this summer. A patch was growing on the south bank, another at the end of the small island that lies near the river’s mouth that’s currently blocked by sand. Cattails exist on the periphery of ponds and marshes. They are abundantly seen in bogs. Cattails are often deliberately planted in slow, effluent-bearing streams flowing from wastewater treatment plants. Cattails remove nutrients—usually ammonia from animal waste or fertilizers. Ammonia accelerates algae growth. Unfortunately—as yet—there are not enough cattails to remove the nutrients in the estuarine mouth of the Navarro River.

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